Happy Teachers Day!

A heartfelt thank you to all the teachers who spend their time, energy, and love to care to educate our children. Happy Teachers Day!

Teacher’s Day is celebrated on September 5, 2017, in India. This date marks the birth anniversary of Dr Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, who was born on September 5, 1888. Dr Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan was the second president of India and people all over the country remember his great contributions to the country. The renowned scholar had asked people to celebrate his birthday as Teacher’s Day and the first Teacher’s day was celebrated on September 5, 1962.

Dr Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan was the first vice-president of our country, and people honour all the teachers who have contributed to our lives. Dr Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan was awarded several high awards in his life including honorary membership of the British Royal Order of Merit in 1963. While the traditional Vedic Teachers’ day is celebrated on Guru Purnima, Teacher’s Day celebrations on September 5 usually include special functions that are organised by students to make their teachers feel special. Kids in schools and colleges also present special cards, greetings, bouquets and gifts to their teachers.

 

Can you hear a pin drop? What is the meaning of pin drop silence?

Can you hear a pin drop?

What is the meaning of pin drop silence?

Following are some instances when silence could speak louder than voice.

Take 1:

Field Marshal Sam Bahadur Maneckshaw once started addressing a public meeting at Ahmedabad in English.

The crowd started chanting, “Speak in Gujarati.

We will hear you only if you speak in Gujarati.”
Field Marshal Sam Bahadur Maneckshaw stopped.
Swept the audience with a hard stare and replied,

“Friends, I have fought many a battle in my long career.
I have learned Punjabi from men of the Sikh Regiment;
Marathi from the Maratha Regiment;
Tamil from the men of the Madras Sappers;
Bengali from the men of the Bengal Sappers,
Hindi from the Bihar Regiment; and
Even Nepali from the Gurkha Regiment.

Unfortunately there was no soldier from Gujarat from whom I could have learned Gujarati.”…

You could have heard a pin drop

Take 2:

Robert Whiting,
an elderly US gentleman of 83, arrived in Paris by plane.

At French Customs, he took a few minutes to locate his passport in his carry on.

“You have been to France before, Monsieur ?”, the Customs officer asked sarcastically.

Mr. Whiting admitted that he had been to France previously.

“Then you should know enough to have your passport ready.”

The American said,
“The last time I was here,
I didn’t have to show it.”

“Impossible.
Americans always have to show their passports on arrival in France !”, the Customs officer sneered.

The American senior gave the Frenchman a long, hard look.

Then he quietly explained

“Well, when I came ashore at Omaha Beach,
at 4:40am, on D-Day in 1944, to help liberate your country, I couldn’t find a single Frenchman to show a passport to…. ”

You could have heard a pin drop

 

Take 3:

Soon after getting freedom from British rule in 1947, the de-facto prime minister of India, Jawahar Lal Nehru called a meeting of senior Army Officers to select the first General of the Indian army.

Nehru proposed, “I think we should appoint a British officer as a General of The Indian Army, as we don’t have enough experience to lead the same.”
Having learned under the British, only to serve and rarely to lead, all the civilians and men in uniform present nodded their heads in agreement.

However one senior officer, Nathu Singh Rathore, asked for permission to speak.

Nehru was a bit taken aback by the independent streak of the officer, though, he asked him to speak freely.

Rathore said, “You see, sir, we don’t have enough experience to lead a nation too, so shouldn’t we appoint a British person as the first Prime Minister of India?”

You could hear a pin drop.

 

After a pregnant pause, Nehru asked Rathore,
“Are you ready to be the first General of The Indian Army?”..

Rathore declined the offer saying “Sir, we have a very talented army officer, my senior, Gen. Cariappa, who is the most deserving among us.”

This is how the brilliant Gen. Cariappa became the first General and Rathore the first ever Lt. General of the Indian Army.

(Many thanks to Lt. Gen Niranjan Malik PVSM (Retd) for this article.)

 

👌👌👌🙏🙏
Worth reading??

President of India allocates portfolios of the Council of Ministers 

President of India allocates portfolios of the Council of Ministers

The President of India, as advised by the Prime Minister, has directed the allocation of portfolios among the following members of the Union Council of Ministers:-

 

Shri Narendra Modi

Prime Minister and also in-charge of:

Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions;

Department of Atomic Energy;

Department of Space; and

All important policy issues; and

All other portfolios not allocated to any Minister.

 

CABINET MINISTERS

 

1.

Shri Raj Nath Singh

Minister of Home Affairs.

2.

Smt. Sushma Swaraj

Minister of External Affairs.

3.

Shri Arun Jaitley

Minister of Finance; and

Minister of Corporate Affairs.

4.

Shri Nitin Jairam Gadkari

Minister of Road Transport and Highways;

Minister of Shipping; and

Minister of Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation.

5.

Shri Suresh Prabhu

Minister of Commerce and Industry.

6.

Shri D.V. Sadananda Gowda

Minister of Statistics and Programme Implementation.

7.

Sushri Uma Bharati

Minister of Drinking Water and Sanitation.

8.

Shri Ramvilas Paswan

Minister of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution.

9.

Smt. Maneka Sanjay Gandhi

Minister of Women and Child Development.

10.

Shri Ananthkumar

Minister of Chemicals and Fertilizers; and

Minister of

Parliamentary Affairs.

11.

Shri Ravi Shankar Prasad

Minister of Law and Justice; and

Minister of Electronics and Information Technology.

12.

Shri Jagat Prakash Nadda

Minister of Health and Family Welfare.

13.

Shri Ashok Gajapathi Raju Pusapati

Minister of Civil Aviation.

14.

Shri Anant Geete

Minister of Heavy Industries and Public Enterprises.

15.

Smt. Harsimrat Kaur Badal

Minister of Food Processing Industries.

16.

Shri Narendra Singh Tomar

Minister of Rural Development;

Minister of Panchayati Raj; and

Minister of Mines.

17.

Shri Chaudhary Birender Singh

Minister of Steel.

18.

Shri Jual Oram

Minister of Tribal Affairs.

19.

Shri Radha Mohan Singh

Minister of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare.

20.

Shri Thaawar Chand Gehlot

Minister of Social Justice and Empowerment.

21.

Smt. Smriti Zubin Irani

Minister of Textiles; and

Minister of Information and Broadcasting.

22.

Dr. Harsh Vardhan

Minister of Science and Technology;

Minister of Earth Sciences; and

Minister of Environment, Forest and Climate Change.

23.

Shri Prakash Javadekar

Minister of Human Resource Development.

24.

Shri Dharmendra Pradhan

Minister of Petroleum and Natural Gas; and

Minister of Skill Development and Entrepreneurship.

25.

Shri Piyush Goyal

Minister of Railways; and

Minister of Coal.

26.

Smt. Nirmala Sitharaman

Minister of Defence.

27.

Shri Mukhtar Abbas Naqvi

Minister of Minority Affairs.

 

MINISTERS OF STATE (INDEPENDENT CHARGE)

 

1.

Rao Inderjit Singh

Minister of State (Independent Charge) of the Ministry of Planning; and

Minister of State in the Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilizers.

2.

Shri Santosh Kumar Gangwar

Minister of State (Independent Charge) of the Ministry of Labour and Employment.

3.

Shri Shripad Yesso Naik

Minister of State (Independent Charge) of the Ministry of Ayurveda, Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy (AYUSH).

4.

Dr. Jitendra Singh

Minister of State (Independent Charge) of the Ministry of Development of North Eastern Region;

Minister of State in the Prime Minister’s Office;

Minister of State in the Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions;

Minister of State in the Department of Atomic Energy; and

Minister of State in the Department of Space.

5.

Dr. Mahesh Sharma

Minister of State (Independent Charge) of the Ministry of Culture; and

Minister of State in the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change.

6.

Shri Giriraj Singh

Minister of State (Independent Charge) of the Ministry of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises.

7.

Shri Manoj Sinha

Minister of State (Independent Charge) of the Ministry of Communications; and

Minister of State in the Ministry of Railways.

8.

Col. Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore

Minister of State (Independent Charge) of the Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports; and

Minister of State in the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting.

9.

Shri Raj Kumar Singh

Minister of State (Independent Charge) of the Ministry of Power; and

Minister of State (Independent Charge) of the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy.

10.

Shri Hardeep Singh Puri

Minister of State (Independent Charge) of the Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs.

11.

Shri Alphons Kannanthanam

Minister of State (Independent Charge) of the Ministry of Tourism; and

Minister of State in the Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology.

 

MINISTERS OF STATE

 

1.

Shri Vijay Goel

Minister of State in the Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs; and

Minister of State in the Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation.

2.

Shri Radhakrishnan P.

Minister of State in the Ministry of Finance; and

Minister of State in the Ministry of Shipping.

3.

Shri S.S. Ahluwalia

Minister of State in the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation.

4.

Shri Ramesh Chandappa Jigajinagi

Minister of State in the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation.

5.

Shri Ramdas Athawale

Minister of State in the Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment.

6.

Shri Vishnu Deo Sai

Minister of State in the Ministry of Steel.

7.

Shri Ram Kripal Yadav

Minister of State in the Ministry of Rural Development.

8.

Shri Hansraj Gangaram Ahir

Minister of State in the Ministry of Home Affairs.

9.

Shri Haribhai Parthibhai Chaudhary

Minister of State in the Ministry of Mines; and

Minister of State in the Ministry of Coal.

10.

Shri Rajen Gohain

Minister of State in the Ministry of Railways.

11.

General (Retd.) V. K. Singh

Minister of State in the Ministry of External Affairs.

12.

Shri Parshottam Rupala

Minister of State in the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare; and

Minister of State in the Ministry of Panchayati Raj.

13.

Shri Krishan Pal

Minister of State in the Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment.

14.

Shri Jaswantsinh Sumanbhai Bhabhor

Minister of State in the Ministry of Tribal Affairs.

15.

Shri Shiv Pratap Shukla

Minister of State in the Ministry of Finance.

16.

Shri Ashwini Kumar Choubey

Minister of State in the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

17.

Shri Sudarshan Bhagat

Minister of State in the Ministry of Tribal Affairs.

18.

Shri Upendra Kushwaha

Minister of State in the Ministry of Human Resource Development.

19.

Shri Kiren Rijiju

Minister of State in the Ministry of Home Affairs.

20.

Dr. Virendra Kumar

Minister of State in the Ministry of Women and Child Development; and

Minister of State in the Ministry of Minority Affairs.

21.

Shri Anantkumar Hegde

Minister of State in the Ministry of Skill Development and Entrepreneurship.

22.

Shri M. J. Akbar

Minister of State in the Ministry of External Affairs.

23.

Sadhvi Niranjan Jyoti

Minister of State in the Ministry of Food Processing Industries.

24.

Shri Y. S. Chowdary

Minister of State in the Ministry of Science and Technology; and

Minister of State in the Ministry of Earth Sciences.

25.

Shri Jayant Sinha

Minister of State in the Ministry of Civil Aviation.

26.

Shri Babul Supriyo

Minister of State in the Ministry of Heavy Industries and Public Enterprises.

27.

Shri Vijay Sampla

Minister of State in the Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment.

28.

Shri Arjun Ram Meghwal

Minister of State in the Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs; and

Minister of State in the Ministry of Water Resources,
River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation.

29.

Shri Ajay Tamta

Minister of State in the Ministry of Textiles.

30.

Smt. Krishna Raj

Minister of State in the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare.

31.

11 Financial Planninng lessons from Ganesha..

11 Financial Planninng lessons from Ganesha..

*1. Big Head*

Think big. Think outside established avenues of investing..

*2. Small Eyes*

Concentrate. Your financial planning needs concentration and you have to focus on the smallest details of investment.

*3. Large Ears*

Listen carefully. Listen to your financial advisor, listen to the news and keep yourself updated.

*4. Small Mouth*

Actions are stronger than words. Listen more and talk less! Your financial plans are not for the world to know.

*5. Ekdanta*

The one tusk symoblizes keeping the good and removing the bad. Study your investments and remove the bad ones periodically.

*6. Vakratunda*

The trunk conveys that one should he efficient and adaptable to ones surroundings. Be patient and don’t panic.

*7. Lambodara*

The big stomach conveys that one should digest both good and bad. Not all investments give you profits. Learn to identify what went wrong.

*8 Right foot over left foot*

Knowledge and reason comes over emotions. Never take decisions based on emotions! Many people make terrible investments just to keep a relationship with their bankers going.

*9. Axe*

Cut away all attachments. Favourite stock, favourite mutual funds are not good in the long run. Don’t get emotionally attached to your investments.

*10. Mooshak*

Mooshak, the mouse, is Ganesha’s ride. It conveys that one can always start small! Investments are not just for the rich and affluent.

*11. Modak*

The fruits of patience are sweet! Give your investments time to grow and reward you.

_Stay devoted to making informed investment decisions and you shall have a wealthy and carefree life.

Is ancient India overrated ? A mindblowing analysis by Chinese Ex Professor from University of Toronto

Is ancient India overrated ?

A mindblowing analysis by Chinese Ex Professor from University of Toronto

Author: Pak L. Huide
Publication: Postcard.news
Date: July 22, 2017
URL: http://postcard.news/is-ancient-india-overrated-a-mind blowing-analysis-by-chinese-professor-from-university-of-toronto/

Seriously? If anything, ancient India is sorely UNDERRATED.

I mean, *I’m an ethnic Chinese living in Canada.* But when I was growing up in Canada, I knew jackshit about India. Besides maybe curry.

I mean, people here have a vague understanding of Chinese history but they have NO idea about Indian history. For example, most people know that the Middle Kingdom is how China referred to herself but how many people know about *Bharat?* How many know about even the Guptas? People know that China was famous for ceramics and tea but how many people know about *ancient India’s achievements in metallurgy?* People k now about the Great Wall, but how many know about the *great temples of southern India?*

This is partly due to the lackluster historical records that ancient Indians kept and also partly because *modern Indians have a tendency to look down upon their ancient heritage and view western ideas and ideals as superior.* China also has this problem but not nearly to the same extent.

The discovery that the *earth is spherical* is credited to the Greek philosopher Aristotle, who was born in 384 BCE. However, very few people know that a man from ancient India established the idea of “spherical earth” during the 8th-9th century BCE. *The man was called Yajnavalkya* who first discovered that the earth is round. He was the first to *propose the heliocentric system of the planets*. In his work Shatapatha Brahmana, he proposed that the earth and the other planets move around the sun. He also *calculated the period of one year as 365.24675 days. This is only 6 minutes longer than the current established time of 365.24220 days*.

Take the example of Kung Fu. The whole world knows about the martial art called Kung Fu. The person who founded *Kung Fu was none other than a prince of the Pallava dynasty from Kanchipuram*, Tamil Nadu who visited China during the 5th century CE. He became the 28th patriarch of Buddhism and *established the Shaolin temple* and founded the martial art which became world famous today. That prince was called Bodhidharma.

But how many people know about that Kung Fu and Shaolin was founded by an Indian?

Precisely, if Indians are unaware of their heritage, why should they expect that someone else will know about their history and achievement?

The achievements of ancient Indians are lost in obscurity. India’s ancestors had invented many ways which eased the basic life of a common man. These inventions may seem primitive today, but we can’t ignore the fact that these were revolutionary achievements during their era.

The Indus Valley civilization is *known for the broad and the sanitized drainage system* which was no less than a miracle during those ancient times. But how many people know that the ancient *Indians from Indus Valley Civilization (IVC) were the first to invent a flush toilet?*

The people around the world use rulers to measure everything. How many people know that *Indus Valley Civi lization was the first to invent the rulers?* A ruler has been found at Lothal which is 4400 years old. Not only this, the people of IVC were *the first to invent buttons*. The world knows that the Chinese discovered the art of weaving silk dresses. How many people know that *IVC people were the first to weave dresses made of cottons?*

The ancient Indians were *first to invent the weighing scales.* Archaeologists have discovered weighs and scales from the excavation sites of Harappa, Mohenjodaro, Lothal etc. These scales were extensively used for trading.

Ancient India has given *Yoga to the world- which is widely practiced almost all over the world to keep people fit and fine.* Models, supermodels, film stars, athletes, etc. regularly attends Yoga session to keep themselves fit.

*Aryabhatta, Brahmagupta and Bhaskaracharya* were the three eminent mathematicians from ancient India who established the *concept of zero as a mathematical value in different eras.* Brahmagupta was the first to invent a symbol for the value “shunya” (zero).

Bhaskaracharya was the *first to use it as algebra.* The oldest inscription of zero can be found at the *Chaturbhuj temple in Gwalior fort.*

Ancient Indians were pioneers in the *field of chemistry* too. The person who first invented the *“atomic theory” was none other than Acharya Kanad from ancient India*. He explained the atomic theory using terms like “Anu”(atom) and “Paramanu”(nucleus).

Ancient Indians were advanced in *medical science* too. The great physician of the time, Sage Shusrut was the first to carry out different surgeries which included plastic surgery and cataract surgery. His works are composed in his book called Shusrut Samhita (The works of Shusrut). The world hardly knows about *Charak, the great specialist in medicine from ancient India*. He was the first physician to establish the problems and medicinal treaties in fields like *physiology, embryology, digestion, sexual disease, immunity, etc.* His works on Ayurveda is composed as a book called Charak Samhita (The works of Charak).

The Chera dynasty of Tamil Nadu invented the idea of *producing finest steel by heating black magnetite ore along with carbon*. The mixture was kept in a crucible and heated in charcoal furnace. The Wootz Steel originated from India, but today, is popular as Damascus Steel.

India’s monuments are grand and are probably, the only way others recognize the importance of ancient Indian civilization. India’s gigantic monuments bear the testimony of the greatness of ancient India.

This is the *Kailash Temple. It is a megalith* which was constructed by cutting out a single rock- a mountain. The whole mountain was cut from the top to carve out the temple campus.

This is *Dwarka, the grand and mysterious city submerged in the Arabian sea on the extreme west of India.* The submerged heritage is no less than a treasure bearing the pride of Indian race!

This is *Khajuraho, the marvel where the rocks* has taken the form. The best of our monuments are not built on soft rocks like marble. Our ancestors carved out even the hardest of the rocks to give it a beauty.

The grandest and largest temple in India- *Brihadeshwara* temple. Breathtaking, isn’t it?

India is the land of grandest temples and breathtaking architectures. The heritage of India can’t be encapsulated within a small answer! To end the answer with, I will now share my personal favorite- *The Sun Temple of Konark!*

The main structure of the temple was partially destroyed by invaders like Kalapahad- a military general of the medieval period. Later, the prime structure totally collapsed when British stored gunpowder inside the structure and it caught fire accidentally.

Even though the main temple is gone, the amount of what left is still breathtaking by every means. Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore wrote about Konark- *“here the language of stone surpasses the language of man.*”

The whole temple was designed like a huge chariot of Sun God having 24 wheels pulled by 7 horses. Each wheel had 8 major spokes denoting 1 prahar (Hindu time period of 3 hours). There was a huge magnet at the top of the temple which used to keep the idol of the Sun deity suspended in the air due to magnetic arrangement.

Still think, that ancient India is overrated?

Ancient India was a hub of culture and technology and the absolute capital of world spirituality. I could talk about India for hours. India is many things but OVERRATED is definitely not one of them.

🙏🏼🙏🏼

Higher coffee consumption associated with lower risk of early death

Higher coffee consumption associated with lower risk of early death

This analysis included 19,896 participants of the SUN Project, whose average age at enrollment was 37.7 years old. On entering the study, participants completed a previously validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire to collect information on coffee consumption, lifestyle and sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometric measurements, and previous health conditions.

Patients were followed-up for an average of ten years. Information on mortality was obtained from study participants and their families, postal authorities, and the National Death Index. Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for incident mortality according to baseline total coffee consumption adjusted for potential confounders.

During the ten year period, 337 participants died. The researchers found that participants who consumed at least four cups of coffee per day had a 64% lower risk of all-cause mortality than those who never or almost never consumed coffee.

NEW PASSPORT RULES

NEW PASSPORT RULES

The Ministry of External Affairs just recently announced a new set of rules for applying for a passport. And we’ve summarized some of the major changes that these new rules have bought in.

DOCUMENTATION FOR PROOF OF BIRTH
As per the earlier rules, submitting a birth certificate was compulsory for all applicants born on/after 26th January 1989. But the new rules have bought in a relaxation in this regards. Now, any of the following documents containing the DOB of the applicant will suffice:

Birth Certificate (BC) issued by the Registrar of births and deaths or the Municipal Corporation or any other prescribed authority whosoever has been empowered under the Registration of Birth & Deaths Act, 1969 to register the birth of a child born in India
Transfer/school leaving/matriculation certificate issued by the school last attended/recognized educational board
PAN card
Aadhar card/E-aadhar
Copy of the extract of the service record of the applicant (only in respect of Government servants) or the pay pension order (in respect of retired government servants), duly attested/certified by the officer/in-charge of the administration of the concerned ministry/department of the applicant
Driving license